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SPARKLING WINES: THRIFTY SHOPPER’S GUIDE 2018

sparkling wines

Back by popular demand, my thrifty shopper’s guide to sparkling wines! I bring you 10 great value recommendations to help you glide merrily through the holiday season without breaking the bank.

Last year, I covered the basic styles of sparkling wines, why fizz makes us festive, and gave broad production method explanations. If you would like a refresher, click here.

This year, I am going to dive right in with my top tipples. If you scroll to the bottom, I have also included a bonus video all about Prosecco.

So, without further ado…the sparkling wines to test out this holiday season:

Freixenet Elyssia Gran Cuvée Brut NV, Cava Reserva (Spain) – 88pts. VW

This attractive Gran Cuvée blends Chardonnay and a touch of Pinot Noir with traditional Cava grapes. Tempting hints of brioche, grilled nuts and yellow apple feature on the nose. Firm bubbles and fresh acidity give way to a broad, rounded mid-palate and smooth, dry finish.

Where to Buy: SAQ (18.60$)

Ottopiu V8+ Sior Carlo Brut Millesimato 2017, Prosecco DOC (Italy) – 87pts. VW

Delicate style of Prosecco with soft, faintly frothy bubbles and white orchard fruit aromas that amplify on the palate and linger on the clean, fresh finish. Great for lunch time imbibing with its feather light structure and 11% alcohol.

Where to buy: SAQ (19.85$)

Moingeon Prestige Brut NV Crémant de Bourgogne (France) – 89pts. VW

Very pleasant for the price. The nose is restrained upon opening but offers red apple, quince, hints of brioche and ripe lemon aromas with a little time in the glass. Crisp and light bodied on the palate with broad, rounded bubbles. Bright notes of lemon and apple lift the mid-palate. Finishes dry.

Where to buy: SAQ (19.85$)

Auguste Pirou Brut NV Crémant du Jura (France) – 88pts PW

This Pinot Noir, Chardonnay blend from the Jura, while not overly complex or concentrated, is incredibly vibrant. Lemon and yellow apple aromas dominate, with gooseberry hints and a touch of brioche emerging with time. Tangy and light bodied on the palate, with firm bubbles, a faintly creamy texture and a fresh, lifted finish. Brut.

Where to Buy: SAQ (21,05$)

Juvé y Camps Reserva de la Familia 2015, Cava Gran Reserva (Spain) – 92pts. PW

In terms of value for money, this was the absolute star of the 70 odd sparkling wines at a recent industry tasting here in Montréal. Surprisingly complex on the nose, brimming with ripe yellow fruit aromas, underscored by hints of toast, star anise and earthy nuances. Brisk in acidity, with vigorous bubbles, moderate concentration and an attractive, textural quality on the mid-palate. Nutty, savoury notes linger on the bone-dry (extra-brut) finish.

Where to Buy: SAQ (22.25$)

Bisol Crede 2017, Conegliano-Valdobbiadene Prosecco Superiore DOCG (Italy) – 89pts. PW

Very pretty white floral, pear, and lime notes on the nose. Fresh and fruity on the palate, with delicate, well formed bubbles, light body, moderate depth of flavour, and hints of saline minerality on the dry (verging on extra-brut) finish.

Where to buy: SAQ (22.15$)

Cave Spring Blanc de Blancs NV Sparkling, Niagara (Canada) – 91pts PW

This is some classy sparkling wine for the price. Aged 30 months on its lees, the Cave Spring Blanc de Blancs features enticing aromas of bread dough, green apple, and wet stone on the nose. Delicate floral and citrus notes develop with aeration. Crisp acidity, taut structure and fine, persistent mousse expertly balance the creamy, layered mid-palate and brut dosage. Lovely.

Where to Buy: SAQ (29,90$). LCBO (29.95$)

Rosehall Run Ceremony Brut Blanc de Blancs, Prince Edward County (Canada) – 92pts PW

Another serious, home-grown contender! Elegant, floral nose, mingled with red apple, hints of nectarine, green almond, and brioche. Crisp, taut and lean on the palate, with very fine bubbles, lovely saline minerality and a zesty, citrus-driven, bone-dry finish.

Where to Buy: LCBO (34.95$). Quebec: inquire with winery

Roederer Estate Brut NV, Anderson Valley (California) – 90pts. PW

Consistently well crafted from one bottling to the next, the Roederer Estate Brut is big and bold with intense aromas of yellow pear, pâtisserie notes, and exotic spice. Fresh, quite full bodied, and very creamy in texture, with firm, persistent bubbles and concentrated flavours of hazelnut and ripe, yellow fruits. Medium in length. Brut dosage.

Where to Buy: SAQ (35.35$). LCBO (37.95$)

Le Marchesine Franciacorta Rose Mellisimato 2013 (Italy) – 91pts. PW

Pale salmon in colour, with an initially restrained nose that develops intriguing hints of brioche, cinnamon spice, orange zest, and cranberry with aeration. Crisp, taut, light in body, and faintly creamy on the palate, with very fine, persistent mousse, and a zesty, dry finish. Brut dosage.

Where to Buy: SAQ (38.75$)

 

Curious to learn more about Italy’s most famous fizz? Check out my Prosecco 101 video featuring loads of great tips to help you understand the label and get the Prosecco that best suits your palate. If you enjoy it, consider subscribing to my channel to follow my weekly wine education series!

 

 

Life

Free Trade for Canadian Wine

free trade canadian wine

This past week-end, I attended the International Cool Climate Chardonnay Celebration (I4C). Held in the Niagara region of Ontario, this joyous event is equal parts professional conference on cool climate winemaking, and raucous party toasting Canada’s arrival in the realm of world-class fine wines.

I tasted so many delicious sparkling wines, Chardonnays, Pinot Noirs and Cabernet Francs that I literally lost count. I came home brimming over with enthusiasm, ready to stock my cellar with Canadian wine. But I can’t.

Why you ask?

Because in Canada, we cannot legally order wine for home delivery from an out-of-province winery (except in BC, Manitoba and Nova Scotia). And because we have provincial alcohol monopolies, I can only buy what one single retailer decides to offer me.

In Canada, we cannot legally order wine for home delivery from an out-of-province winery.

According to the Canadian Vintners Association, 100% Canadian wine represents less than a 5 % wine sales market share in eight of our 10 provinces. No other wine producing country in the world has such ludicrously low domestic market share.

To test this theory, I took a stroll through my local SAQ the other day. I was happy to see a prominent “Origine Québec” section. However, when I looked for wines from Canada’s other provinces, I was sorely disappointed. There were a total of three wines. They were sitting in the category headed “Autres Pays” (Other Countries), mixed in with wines from obscure eastern European origins.

When I asked an employee if this was the extent of their domestic range, he reassured me that there were more in the produits réguliers (general list) section. He led me to the aisle. Under the category “United States”, I found 2 more Canadian wines.

Canadian wine represents less than a 5 % wine sales market share in eight of our 10 provinces.

Granted, this was one of the smaller format, SAQ Classique stores. But it is located in the heart of one of Montréal’s busiest commercial and residential neighbourhoods. While the larger SAQ Séléction outlets have a better range of Canadian wines, these stores are fewer and farther between.

I can always order on-line from the liquor board, but the selection is a mere fraction of what is on offer direct from the wineries.

So why can’t I just order direct? Because provincial laws exist across Canada that prohibit the cross-border movement of alcohol. Even if I were to get in my car and drive the 4.5 hours to Prince Edward County or 6.5 hours to Niagara, I still couldn’t legally bring back more than 12 bottles (9 litres).

Nearly a century since the end of prohibition, and we are still being told that we require public supervision of our alcohol intake…

In 2012 Gerard Comeau, a New Brunswick native, was fined 292$ for bringing Québec purchased beer into the province. Comeau refused to pay, citing section 121 of Canada’s constitution which promises free trade of goods between provinces. After a 5-year legal battle, the Supreme Court of Canada ruled against Comeau. They argued that the New Brunswick provincial legislation (section 134B) was not intended to restrict trade, simply to “enable public supervision of the production, movement, sale, and use of alcohol within New Brunswick”.

Nearly a century since the end of prohibition, and we are still being told by the Canadian powers-that-be, that we require public supervision of our alcohol intake. And that this imperative trumps our constitutional right to free trade.

The subject of interprovincial alcohol trade was on the agenda of last week’s meeting of Canada’s premiers. The consensus reached was less than impressive. While the premiers agree to “significantly increase personal use exemption limits”, according to New Brunswick Premier Brian Gallant, no specific amount or clear indication of timelines were given.

It is not simply the principle of the matter that irks me, it is the great disservice being done to our fledgling wine industry.

And no matter what the new limits are, the very fact that there are limits flies in the face of free trade. It is not simply the principle of the matter that irks me, it is the great disservice being done to our fledgling wine industry. It would seem that our governments are far more concerned with protecting the revenue stream from alcohol monopolies, than supporting the development of Canada’s wineries.

Great wine is being made across Canada – from British Columbia to Nova Scotia. If you want to stand behind Canadian grape growers and winemakers, head on over to FreeMyGrapes and make your voice heard.

You can toast your contribution with a glass of fine Canadian sparkling wine. Stay tuned for bubbly recommendations in next article.